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‘Modern Myths of Muslim Anti-Semitism&#82...

Mark R. Cohen, Ph.D., Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East, Emeritus, and professor of Near Eastern Studies, Emeritus, at Princeton University, will discuss “Modern Myths of Muslim Anti-Semitism” at The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Judaic Studies Institute lecture on Thursday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pearn Auditorium of the Brennan Hall.
April 20, 2018

A highly-respected scholar and author will present his views on the history and current state of Muslim-Jewish relations at The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Judaic Studies Institute lecture on Thursday, May 3. Mark R. Cohen, Ph.D., Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East, Emeritus, and professor of Near Eastern Studies, Emeritus, at Princeton University, will discuss “Modern Myths of Muslim Anti-Semitism.” The lecture, which is free of charge and open to the public, will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Pearn Auditorium of the Brennan Hall.

Dr. Cohen will examine several questions to determine the root of contemporary Muslim anti-Semitism: Does it stem from the Qur’an and other foundational Islamic texts? Is it endemic to Islam and, therefore, ineradicable? Or is this anti-Semitism new, originating in Western (Christian) Jew-hatred that arrived in the Middle East on the heels of colonialism, and later became clothed in Islamic garb? And, if so, has this Muslim anti-Semitism somehow been enflamed by the rise of Zionism and the conflict with Israel?

Dr. Cohen’s publications include “Jewish Self-Government in Medieval Egypt”; “Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages”; “Poverty and Charity in the Jewish Community of Medieval Egypt;” and, most recently, “Maimonides and the Merchants: Jewish Law and Society in the Medieval Islamic World.” Until his retirement from Princeton in 2013, he was director of the Princeton Geniza Project, an online database of transcriptions of documents from the Cairo Geniza.

The Weinberg Judaic Studies Institute was created in 1979 through an endowment funded by the local Jewish community. The Institute fosters a better understanding and appreciation of Judaism, Israel and their histories. It supports visits to the University by Jewish scholars and writers and supports library acquisitions, publications, faculty research, travel and other scholarly endeavors. The work of the Institute was further enhanced by a $1 million gift from Harry Weinberg in 1990.

For further information, contact Mark Shapiro, Ph.D., professor of theology/religious studies at The University of Scranton, at 570-941-7956 or marc.shapiro@scranton.edu.

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