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    Luncheon Seminars Provide Timely Knowledge

    The Schemel Forum’s World Affairs Luncheon Seminars explore our nation’s relationship to the world, the value of a liberal arts education, the true meaning and power of citizenship, insights into the constitutional powers of our three branches of government, and the impact of cybercrime and what can be done about it.
    August 27, 2018

    In an era marked by feelings of confusion and powerlessness, The Schemel Forum’s World Affairs Luncheon Seminars at The University of Scranton offer local residents understanding and hope. During the fall semester, experts in their fields will explore the value of a liberal arts education, the true meaning and power of citizenship, insights into the constitutional powers of our three branches of government, and the impact of cybercrime and what can be done about it.

    The series begins on Tuesday, Sept. 18, with “Why College?,” presented by William M. Sullivan, Ph.D., senior scholar at New American Colleges and Universities and visiting professor at the Center for the Study of Professions at Oslo and Akerskhus Universities in Norway. “The uncertainties of our times demand a widening of perspective and a stronger sense of social responsibility, which are traditional goals of liberal learning,” said Dr. Sullivan, who will discuss why a strong liberal arts/professional studies education equips students for a successful and meaningful life. “Against the threat of contracting awareness and the shrinkage of solidarity, value-centered higher education can provide a source of hope.” The seminar will take place in the Kane Forum of Edward Leahy Hall.

    On Monday, Oct. 1, Elzbieta Matynia, Ph.D., professor of sociology and liberal studies and director of the Transregional Center for Democratic Studies at the New School for Social Research, will present “Democracy Dies in Darkness.” She will discuss why the performative dimension of democracy – being and acting like a citizen – is a local project trying to free itself from dogmatism and vertical power pressures. The seminar will take place in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall.

    Emily Wilson, Ph.D., professor of classical studies and chair of the Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania, will present “Translating The Odyssey: How and Why” on Wednesday, October 17. She will discuss her process in creating a new verse translation of Homer’s The Odyssey and explain how her translation differs from others currently available in English. The seminar will take place in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall.

    On Thursday, Oct. 25, Eric Schnurer, president of Public Works, LLC, a national public policy consulting firm advising state and local governments, will present “You Can Do Anything.” He will discuss the many ways that citizens can effect change. The seminar will take place in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall.

    On Wednesday, Nov. 7, Morey Myers, Of Counsel, Myers, Brier and Kelly, will present “Going to War: Who Calls the Shots?” The U.S. Constitution authorizes Congress to declare war, yet in our history of hundreds of military encounters, it has happened rarely. He will discuss the role of Congress, the President and the Supreme Court throughout our history in the decision to go to war. The seminar will take place in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall.

    The fall series will conclude on Tuesday, Nov. 13, when Michael Greenberger, J.D., law professor and founder and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, will present “Cybercrime: A Global Weapon of Mass Destruction.”

    Especially when sponsored by Russia, China, North Korea and Iran, these “acts of war” against the U.S. are potentially more dangerous than the 9/11 attacks or the attack on Pearl Harbor. However, our government’s response to threatened cyber-attacks on our national security has been weak.

    “This discussion will focus on specific actions that must be taken immediately by the U.S. and its allies, our state and local governments, our private and non-profit sectors, and, perhaps even more importantly, by you and me,” said Dr. Greenberger, who will provide attendees an opportunity to ask questions and give their own insights. The seminar will take place in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall.

    The World Affairs Luncheon Seminar series is sponsored by Munley Law.

    All seminars include a buffet lunch and run from noon to 1:30 p.m. Participants can register to attend one luncheon for $20 per person or $30 per couple, or for the entire series of six luncheons for $110 per person or $160 per couple (Schemel Forum members attend free).

    To register, contact Alicen Morrison, Schemel Forum assistant, at 570-941-6206 or alicen.morrison@scranton.edu. For more information on Schemel Forum programs and memberships, contact Sondra Myers, Schemel Forum director, at 570-941-4089 or sondra.myers@scranton.edu.

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