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    Data Drives Student Mental Health Response

    In response to a health assessment survey of University students, CHEW has prioritized improving, increasing and promoting programs and services related to stress management, health coping skills and resiliency.
    November 13, 2018

    Data collected through an American College Health Assessment (ACHA) administered survey of Scranton’s undergraduate population have been used to inform services and health promotion offerings, as well as related Student Life planning and programming. 

    The survey of University students, organized by the University’s Center for Health Education and Wellness (CHEW), in collaboration with Student Health Services and the Counseling Center, was given in the fall of 2016. The data has not only helped to inform daily operations, but has also assisted Student Life practitioners in understanding the current needs, perceptions and behaviors of the University’s student population, according to an article by Stephanie Adamac, director of CHEW, and Jeffrey Kegolis, Ph.D., director of student conduct and assessment, published in the fall 2018 newsletter of the Office of Educational Assessment.

    Key findings of the survey showed: 87.2 percent of students described their health as good, very good, or excellent; stress (39 percent) and anxiety (31 percent) were the top two health factors that students reported negatively impacted their academic success; and health information students reported wanting to receive in the future included stress reduction (81 percent), how to help others in distress (78 percent), nutrition (75 percent), depression and anxiety (72 percent) and sleep difficulties (71 percent).

    In response to the survey, for the past three semesters, CHEW has prioritized proactive mental health education and services and alcohol education with an increased emphasis on bystander engagement and the promotion of the University’s Amnesty/Good Samaritan policy. In addition, CHEW has prioritized improving, increasing and promoting programs and services related to stress management, health coping skills and resiliency.

    Among the stress reduction programs offered by CHEW is a biannual Stress Less Week prior to finals each semester. This semester’s Stress Less Week is planned for the week of Dec. 3 through Dec. 7 and includes daily stress relief events.

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