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    PT Students Research Effectiveness of BFR Therapy

    Peter Leininger, Ph.D., assistant professor of physical therapy, demonstrates blood flow restriction (BFR) therapy using the BFR Delphi unit and light-load exercise with a tourniquet, which has been shown to greatly hasten the rehabilitation process. Dr. Leininger and his students will present their BFR research (a systematic review) at the annual American Physical Therapy Association’s national conference in Washington, D.C. in January. From left: Dr. Leininger and DPT graduate students Matthew Aitken ’17, Edison, New Jersey; Omar Amer, Scotch Plains, New Jersey; Stephanie Klug, Mooresville, North Carolina (demonstrating the therapy); Berta Carmo, Parsippany, New Jersey; Jonathan Mayes, Dublin (PA); Dannylyn Manabat, Long Beach, California; Christine Kiefer ’17, Wantagh, New York; and Sophia DiCamillo ’17, Abington.
    December 4, 2018

    Professor Peter Leininger, Ph.D., of the Physical Therapy Department at The University of Scranton, said there are amazing new technologies in exercise science that are revolutionizing the field, shortening the time from surgery to full recovery.

    Among the most exciting is blood flow restriction (BFR) therapy. Essentially, a tourniquet is wrapped around the upper or lower extremity, with controlled and monitored blood flow restriction to the muscles and joints of the knee, hip, ankle, shoulder, elbow or wrist, which greatly hastens the rehabilitation process.

    Dr. Leininger, the only physical therapist in the Scranton area currently certified in BFR, explained that the method started in the military, then spread to professional sports and is now being used by major universities, clinics and hospitals to treat their injured athletes.

    In January, Dr. Leininger and his students will present their BFR research (a systematic review) at the annual American Physical Therapy Association’s national conference in Washington, D.C.  They are also completing a second systematic review studying the effect of BFR training with the older adult population.

    Several research studies are planned at the University utilizing the BFR Delphi unit (currently the only FDA approved blood flow restriction device). The BFR device is being used on campus with several patients following ACL reconstruction to their knees.

    “What is clear is that light-load exercise with a tourniquet that is used properly is safe and effective,” said Dr. Leininger, whose department owns the aforementioned Delfi device.  “It’s a very good way to do light-weight resistance exercise where you don’t damage what was repaired, and recovery is demonstrably faster, decreasing the time necessary to develop increased muscle mass and strength of the injured or surgically repaired region of the body.”

    He says this latest therapy modality is being used more widely following knee surgery, including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, as well as rotator cuff, hip and ankle surgical procedures.

    University Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) graduate students who will be presenting their research at the upcoming conference in January are Matthew Aitken ’17, Edison, New Jersey; Omar Amer, Scotch Plains, New Jersey; Berta Carmo, Parsippany, New Jersey; Sophia DiCamillo ’17, Abington; Christine Kiefer ’17, Wantagh, New York; Dannylyn Manabat, Long Beach, California; and Jonathan Mayes, Dublin (PA).

     

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    Physical Therapy Professor Peter Leininger, Ph.D., demonstrates BFR therapy using the BFR Delphi unit and light-load exercise with a tourniquet with the help of DPT student Stephanie Klug, Mooresville, North Carolina. BFR therapy has been shown to greatly hasten the rehabilitation process. Dr. Leininger is currently the only physical therapist in the Scranton area certified in BFR.

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