Student
    Former CNN Moscow Bureau Chief on Russian Media Impact Banner

    Former CNN Moscow Bureau Chief on Russian Media

    CNN’s former Moscow Bureau Chief, Jill Dougherty presented “Russia and the Post-Truth Society” at a Schemel Forum World Affairs Seminar at The University of Scranton in April. Dougherty was living and working in Moscow in February 2022 when tensions between Russia and Ukraine were rising.
    April 27, 2022
    By: Alison D’Mello ’22, student correspondent

    After serving almost a decade as CNN’s Moscow Bureau Chief, Schemel Forum guest speaker Jill Dougherty was living and working in Moscow in February 2022 when tensions between Russia and Ukraine were rising, witnessing firsthand the tactics used by various media organizations to promote a single narrative.

    “The implications for Ukraine are dire, but the implications for Russia, militarily, and their society in many ways are dire too.”- Jill Dougherty

    After discussing the role American media played in the Russia-Ukraine crisis, Dougherty began to explain how Russian media presented the same situation. By placing Russian weapons and troops in the geographically significant separatist territories of the People’s Republics of Donetsk and Luhansk, Putin effectively had the country of Ukraine surrounded. According to Dougherty, the narrative Russian media presented was that Putin’s intentions for doing this were those of self-defense against a supposed genocide of these people. Dougherty recognized that “what they were doing is what the old Soviet Union used to do with kind of weird little places they would recognize, and then say we have to protect them and then they would put their forces in to ‘protect’ them.’” Dougherty said, “at that moment it was so obvious that they had been setting this up for weeks.”

    Other media tactics employed by some Russian media companies that Dougherty explored in her lecture include: presenting prerecorded statements as live ones; selectively recording attacks in certain areas while ignoring others; and including persuasive rhetoric like referring to people as “traitors.”

    Ultimately, Russian media sanctions against independent media outlets forced many journalists, including Dougherty, out of the country in fear of potential retaliation for statements made on air. However, Dougherty noted that this is not the only recent change that will impact the country and the world in the years to come.

    “The implications for Ukraine are dire, but the implications for Russia, militarily, and their society in many ways are dire too. There’s no other word because both countries will be transformed by what is going on,” said Dougherty.

    Dougherty presented “Russia and the Post-Truth Society” at a Spring Schemel Forum World Affairs Seminar held on The University of Scranton’s campus in April.

    Alison D’Mello ’22, East Brunswick, New Jersey, is a social media strategies major at The University of Scranton.
    Alison D’Mello ’22, East Brunswick, New Jersey, is a social media strategies major at The University of Scranton.
    Back to Top