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    Summer Faculty Development Grants Awarded Impact Banner

    Summer Faculty Development Grants Awarded

    University of Scranton professors Roxana A. Curiel, Ph.D.; Roy Domenico, Ph.D.; Christopher Fremaux, Ph.D.; Madeline B. Gangnes, Ph.D.; Emily Hopkins, Ph.D.; JoyAnna S. Hopper, Ph.D.; David Ingber, Ph.D.; Michael Knies; Declan Mulhall, Ph.D.; Paul Sampson, Ph.D.; and Matthew Shea, Ph.D.; were awarded faculty development summer grants for 2022.
    June 14, 2022

    The University of Scranton awarded faculty development summer grants for 2022 to 11 faculty members.

    Roxana A. Curiel, Ph.D., assistant professor of world languages and cultures, received a grant to research “De muxe a muxe: Mueidad and the Third Gender in Zapotec Culture.” She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree (2012) from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and a Ph.D. (2016) in Peninsular and Mexican Literature and Cultures from the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Curiel has worked for the University since 2020.

    Roy Domenico, Ph.D., professor and chair of the History Department, received a grant to research “Two Worlds: Italo-American Cultural Relations and the Cold War.” He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a master’s degree from the University of Connecticut and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Dr. Domenico has worked for the University since 1997.

    Christopher Fremaux, Ph.D., assistant professor of philosophy, received a grant to research “Crusisu’s Guide to Living Rationally: A Translation Report.” He earned a bachelor’s degree from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas, a master’s degree from Boston College and a Ph.D. from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Dr. Fremaux has worked for the University since 2020.

    Madeline B. Gangnes, Ph.D., assistant professor of English and theatre, received a grant to research “Young Folks and Victorian Illustrated Periodicals.” She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Puget Sound, a master’s degree from the University of Dundee in Scotland and a Ph.D. from the University of Florida. Dr. Gangnes has worked for the University since 2020.

    Emily Hopkins, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology, received a grant to research “Shared storybook reading as an educational tool in early childhood.” She earned a bachelor’s degree from Brown University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Dr. Hopkins has worked for the University since 2018.

    JoyAnna S. Hopper, Ph.D., assistant professor of political science and co-director of the University’s Center for Ethics and Excellence in Public Service, received a grant to research “Environmental Condition and State Environmental Agency Approval.” She earned a bachelor’s degree from Eastern Illinois University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Missouri. Dr. Hopper has worked for the University since 2020.

    David Ingber, Ph.D., faculty specialist in the Biology Department, received a grant to research “Effects of Corn Herbivory-Induced Plant Volatiles (HIPVs) on Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugpiderda Smith) Oviposition Choice.” He earned a a bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York, Oswego, a master’s degree in entomology from Iowa State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. Dr. Ingber has worked for the University since 2019.

    Michael Knies, professor, Weinberg Memorial Library, received a grant to research “The Impact of Linotype Technology on the British Typefounding Industry, 1896-1910. ‘The lino is killing us.’” He earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from the Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree from Rutgers University. He has worked for the University since 1996.

    Declan Mulhall, Ph.D., professor of physics and engineering, received a grant to research “NMR Detector with electronic frequency control.” He earned a bachelor’s degree from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Dr. Mulhall has worked for the University since 2004.

    Paul Sampson, Ph.D., assistant professor of history, received a grant to research “Ventilating the Empire: Environmental Machines in Britain 1700-1850.” He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Dallas, a master’s degree from Marquette University, and his Ph.D., from Rutgers University. Dr. Sampson has worked for the University since 2020.

    Matthew Shea, Ph.D., assistant professor of philosophy, received a grant to research “God and Happiness.” He received a bachelor’s degree from Boston College and a Ph.D. from Boston College. Dr. Shea has worked for the University since 2020.

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