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    Elizabeth Hinton, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale University, will discuss “Riot or Rebellion?: The Meaning of Violent Protest from the 1960s to George Floyd” at this year’s Myers Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture, presented by the Slattery Center for Ignatian Humanities Thursday, Oct. 20, at 5 p.m. in the PNC Auditorium of the Loyola Science Center.

    Author Elizabeth Hinton, Ph.D., to Speak Oct. 20

    Elizabeth Hinton, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale University, will discuss “Riot or Rebellion?: The Meaning of Violent Protest from the 1960s to George Floyd” at this year’s Myers Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture, presented by the Slattery Center for Ignatian Humanities Thursday, Oct. 20, at 5 p.m. in the PNC Auditorium of the Loyola Science Center.
    October 18, 2022

    Author and historian Elizabeth Hinton, Ph.D., will discuss “Riot or Rebellion?: The Meaning of Violent Protest from the 1960s to George Floyd” at this year’s Slattery Center for Ignatian Humanities presentation of the Myers Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture on Thursday, Oct. 20. The lecture, presented free of charge and open to the public, will begin at 5 p.m. in the PNC Auditorium of the Loyola Science Center.

    Dr. Hinton is an associate professor in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale University, with a secondary appointment as professor of law at Yale Law School. Her research focuses on the persistence of poverty, racial inequality and urban violence in the 20th century United States. She is considered one of the nation’s leading experts on criminalization and policing. Her books include “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America” and “America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s.”

    At the Myers Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture, Dr. Hinton will discuss “a troubling journey from Detroit in 1967 and Miami in 1980 to Los Angeles in 1992 and beyond to chart the persistence of structural racism and one of its primary consequences, the so-called urban riot.” Her discussion “will present a new framework for understanding our nation’s enduring racial strife.”

    Dr. Hinton’s articles and op-eds can be found in the pages of the Journal of American History, the Journal of Urban History, The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Boston Review, The Nation and Time. She also coedited “The New Black History: Revisiting the Second Reconstruction” with the late historian Manning Marable.

    Dr. Hinton earned her bachelor’s degree from New York University and her master’s degree and doctorate from Columbia University. Her many academic awards include being named a Ford Foundation and Carnegie Corporation Fellow.

    The Myers Distinguished Visiting Fellowship Lecture, presented by The Gail and Francis Slattery Center for Humanities, is named in honor of esteemed community leaders Sondra and Morey Myers, J.D. Sondra Myers serves as director of the Schemel Forum at The University of Scranton.

    Immediately following the lecture, a cocktail reception will be held for faculty and staff.

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