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A Typical Sunday with Dr. Kim Pavlick

A Pavlick-Okrepkie family tradition is staffing the instant bingo booth at the Our Lady of the Snows/Church of St. Benedict’s Country bazaar every summer. Left to right: Ken Okrepkie, Emily Okrepkie, Kim Pavlick and Grace Okrepkie.
November 23, 2015
By: Jessica Perillo and Michele Schulmeister
I was raised that we eat together as a family, and that means sometimes we don’t eat until very late in the evening.- Kim Pavlick, Ph.D.

Always a bundle of joy and energy, Kim Pavlick, Ph.D., a full-time communication professor, serves as a mother figure to all of her students. Dr. Pavlick’s enthusiasm is contagious, and her tireless commitment to teaching is more than enough to keep her (or anyone, really!) busy.

We wondered if she carried through that enthusiasm to the weekends, so we asked her.

Despite her hectic schedule, she claims that there is “nothing exciting” about her world and that all you need to live a full life is faith, love and a good dessert.

Rise and Run

I start my day the same way seven days a week; I’m up before my alarm. I get up and I head to the treadmill. I catch up on world events on TV while I’m running. If I’m already caught up, then I pull something off the DVR that I have recorded and I watch that until I finish my run. I usually run 3.5 to 5 miles in the morning depending on how I’m feeling. Some days it’s a very fast walk because I’m getting older and my knees hurt. My run wakes me up, but I wake up every day grateful and happy… that’s a great pick-me-up.

A Good Start

I love reading the Sunday paper and drinking a cup of coffee while listening to the morning talk shows. I cook a big breakfast on Sundays—sometimes it’s something as simple as scrambled eggs and toast.

With the Kids

Some Sunday afternoons I read, sometimes I’m at sporting events with Grace, sometimes Emily and I will shop when she’s home from college…

Home-Cooked Meals

I cook most nights because I’m very into knowing where my food comes from and how it’s prepared. I was raised that we eat together as a family, and that means sometimes we don’t eat until very late in the evening. We sit down and eat because that’s the time to connect as a family. We cook a big family dinner when we come home from church and then bake a good dessert. In my house, Sunday night dessert is a big tradition.

Savoring Sundays
I enjoy every part of the day. I’ve been really trying to be in the moment and appreciate everything around me. I’m trying to pay attention more because time is just moving so quickly I really don’t know how I do it, but I always get to where I need to be.

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