University’s Nurse Anesthesia Program Receives Seven Seals Award

March 27, 2017

The U.S. Department of Defense’s Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) presented its Seven Seals Award to The University of Scranton’s graduate-level Nurse Anesthesia Program. the Seven Seals is presented in recognition of significant individual or organizational achievement, initiative or support promoting the program’s mission. From left: University of Scranton students Kristen Vitousek and Brandon Coury; Susan Elczyna, Ph.D., C.R.N.A., clinical faculty specialist, Nurse Anesthesia Program, The University of Scranton; Mike Jones, northeast area chair for ESGR; Bernard J. Gilligan, III, D.N.P., C.R.N.A., program administrator, Nurse Anesthesia Program, The University of Scranton; Ann Culp, D.N.P., C.R.N.A., assistant program administrator, Nurse Anesthesia Program, The University of Scranton; and Jill Lear, administrative assistant, nurse anesthesia program, The University of Scranton.

In recognition of the outstanding support provided to active members of the military and reserve, the U.S. Department of Defense’s Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) presented its Seven Seals Award to The University of Scranton’s graduate-level Nurse Anesthesia Program. Mike Jones, northeast area chair for ESGR, presented the award to the faculty of the Nurse Anesthesia Program at a ceremony on campus in March.

The most expansive and inclusive award given by ESGR, the Seven Seals is presented in recognition of significant individual or organizational achievement, initiative or support promoting the program’s mission. Established in 1972, ESGR strives to resolve potential military commitment-related conflicts between Reserve Component Service members and their civilian employers.

The Nurse Anesthesia Program was nominated for the award by student Brandon Coury, Scranton, a former Marine infantryman and current Army Reserve commissioned officer who is finishing up his studies at the University to become a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA).

Given its rigor, nurse anesthesia programs can be especially difficult for active-duty members of the military. However, according to Coury, the University’s Nurse Anesthesia faculty proved exceptionally accommodating to his duty requirements.

“The University of Scranton Nurse Anesthesia Program has consistently gone above and beyond what is state mandated and necessary, to ensure I worry about nothing school related while on duty and facilitate graduation to serve as an anesthesia provider for the armed forces,” Coury wrote in his nomination letter. “They move exams and deadlines around for me and also volunteer their time one-on-one with me to ensure I don't fall behind the rest of the class, all with enthusiasm.”

Coury also mentioned the support the program has given to fellow nurse anesthesia student and armed forces member Kristen Vitousek, Dunmore.

“I think (the program) should be recognized for their efforts,” Coury wrote. “I have friends from the service in other programs and I know for certain that they don't receive the amount of support that we receive here. The support we receive is paramount to our success and ultimately ensures our graduation so that we can serve as anesthesia providers within the military after graduation.”

The University’s Nurse Anesthesia Program is a full-time, comprehensive 28-month program designed to prepare registered nurses to become CRNAs. The program allows students to integrate classroom content with direct application of advanced techniques in the realm of anesthesia care. Students learn clinical skills in several different environments, all of which offer anesthetic management of specialized patient populations.

For more information on the University’s Nurse Anesthesia Program, visit: http://www.scranton.edu/academics/pcps/nursing/nurse-anesthesia.shtml.

For more information on the Seven Seals Award, visit: www.esgr.mil/employer-awards/seven-seals-award.aspx.

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