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    Scranton Faculty Present at Symposium in Taiwan

    Five University faculty presented at the National Taiwan University-Scranton Philosophy Symposium, which took place at the National Taiwan University earlier this year.
    December 9, 2019

    Five University of Scranton faculty presented at the National Taiwan University-Scranton Philosophy Symposium at the National Taiwan University. The symposium is a collaborative effort between the two schools. The first symposium, which focused on the theme “Language and Reality,” took place earlier this year in Taiwan. The theme of the next symposium is “Self and Others” and will take place in October 2020 in Scranton.

    Faculty members who presented in Taiwan were: George Aulisio, associate professor, department chair and research and scholarly services coordinator, Weinberg Memorial Library; Harold Baillie, Ph.D., professor of philosophy; Andrew LaZella, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy and co-director of the University’s honors program; Matthew Meyer, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy, pre-law advisor and faculty director for the Slattery Center for the Humanities; and Ann Pang-White, Ph.D., professor of philosophy and director of the Asian Studies Program at the University.

    Aulisio presented “Language, the Mental Lexicon, and Reality.” He received his bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, his Master of Science from Drexel University and his Master of Arts in Liberal Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the faculty at Scranton in 2009.

    Dr. Baillie presented “Language, Recklessness and Reality in Zhuangzi and Plato.” He received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Boston College. He joined the faculty at Scranton in 1978.

    Dr. LaZella presented “Flatus Vocis: Language and Reality in Medieval Nominalism.” He received his bachelor’s degree from Hamline University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from DePaul University. He joined the faculty at the University in 2010.

    Dr. Meyer presented “The Problem of Opposites as a Fundamental Philosophy.” He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of St. Thomas, his master’s degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from Boston University. He joined the faculty at the University in 2010.

    Dr. Pang-White presented “The Logic of the Ineffable: A Comparative Study of the Plotinian One and the Daoist Dao.” She received her bachelor’s degree from Tung-Hai University, her master’s degree from the University of South Carolina at Columbia and her doctorate from Marquette University. She joined the faculty at the University in 1997.

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