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    Events Explore Story of Scranton

    At the “Scranton in the Popular Imagination” event, which is part of The University of Scranton and community partner’s “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities are, from left: Glynis Johns, founder and CEO, Black Scranton Project; Joseph Kraus, Ph.D., professor and chair of the English and Theatre Department, The University of Scranton; Jay Parini, Ph.D., author and D.E. Axinn Professor of English and Creative Writing at Middlebury College; Hank Willenbrink, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Theatre Program, The University of Scranton; and Julie Schumacher Cohen, assistant vice president for community engagement and government affairs and “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project director, The University of Scranton.
    January 19, 2022

    The University of Scranton and community partners hosted three events recently as part of the “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The purpose of the two-year project is to explore the aspirational journey to fulfill our national ideals through the lens of Scranton, as an iconic “All American City” that has experienced many of the key elements of our nation’s experience: industrial era growth and decline, waves of immigration past and present, Black and Indigenous experiences, and a rich religious and neighborhood tapestry that is integral to Scranton’s community and resilience. Eight themes will involve a range of events, including lectures, dialogues, community workshops and story collection.

    The recent events comprised the theme, “Portrait of Scranton, Portrait of a Nation,” and included a keynote address by Scranton-born author Jay Parini and local panelists on “Scranton in the Popular Imagination,” a Lackawanna Avenue “Jane Jacobs” walk to consider “what Scranton is, has been, and can be,” and a roundtable discussion on “Scranton and the Nation: Who are we and who do we aspire to be?”.

    Upcoming events in winter of 2022 will focus on the U.S. Citizen and the American Founding and will include a book discussion (Feb. 3), lecture with guest scholars (March 1) and public dialogue (March 22) focused around the question: “Freedom and Our Founding – What do they mean for us today?” Spring 2022 events will focus on the Indigenous History of NEPA. For more information visit scranton.edu/scrantonstory.

    • alt placeholderAt the Jane Jacobs Walk, which is part of The University of Scranton and community partner’s “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities are, from left: Julie Schumacher Cohen, assistant vice president for community engagement and government affairs and “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project director, The University of Scranton; Wayne Evans, Jane Jacobs Walk guide, host and owner/realtor of Wayne Evans Realty, Maria MacDonald, executive director, The Center for the Living City and professor of interior architecture, Marywood University.
    • alt placeholderAt the Roundtable Discussion, which is part of The University of Scranton and community partner’s “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities are: Larry West, business administrator, City of Scranton; Sondra Myers, senior fellow for international, civic and cultural projects and director of the Schemel Forum at The University of Scranton; Julie Schumacher Cohen, assistant vice president for community engagement and government affairs and “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” project director, The University of Scranton; Maureen McGuigan, deputy director, Lackawanna County Arts and Culture; and Alejandra Marroquin, co-chair Lackawanna County Immigrant Inclusion Committee.
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