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    University Responds to Ukraine Invasion

    The University of Scranton has lit the Ukraine flag on its Class of 2020 Gateway to “show our thoughts and prayers are with the Ukrainian people, as we join with others across the world to pray peace and freedom are restored to their country and their people once again.”
    March 2, 2022

    Rev. Joseph Marina, S.J., president of The University of Scranton addressed the crisis happening in the Ukraine in an Ash Wednesday message sent to the University community on March 2.

    “Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine last week, we have watched with anguish and deep concern as violence and turmoil unfold in eastern Europe. On this Ash Wednesday, I ask the entire University community to answer the call of Pope Francis to devote ourselves to prayer and fasting for peace today. May we also heed his powerful words: ‘May the weapons fall silent. God is with the peacemakers, not with those who use violence. ... It is the people who are the real victims, who pay for the folly of war with their own skin.’ Let us pray for the Ukrainian people, especially those trapped in the midst of violence and those who are now refugees seeking shelter abroad. Let us be inspired by the courage of Ukrainians as they seek to preserve their freedom and fledgling democracy, and by Russians risking their safety to protest against the war,” wrote Father Marina in the message. He also mentioned the Russian invasion of Ukraine in a Women’s History Month reflection sent to the University community on March 1.

    Since Feb. 26, the Ukraine flag has been lit on the University’s three-story, Class of 2020 Gateway sign to “show our thoughts and prayers are with the Ukrainian people, as we join with others across the world to pray peace and freedom are restored to their country and their people once again,” the University said in a statement.

    In addition, University professors have discussed the ongoing situation with news reporters, including this WNEP-TV story featuring interviews with Gretchen J. Van Dyke, Ph.D., associate professor and acting chair of the Political Science Department, and Sean Brennan, Ph.D., professor of history; and this WNEP-TV interview with Konstantin Lyavdansky, who teaches Russian at the University’s World Languages and Cultures Department. 

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