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    Indigenous History of NEPA Discussed by Authors

    Authors Nicole Eustace, Ph.D., the winner of the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History for her book “Covered with Night,” and Samantha Seeley, Ph.D., author of “Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the Early United States,”will speak on Wednesday, May 11, and Wednesday, May 18, as part of National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supported “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” Project.
    May 10, 2022

    Author Nicole Eustace, Ph.D., the winner of the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History for her book “Covered with Night,” will speak at The University of Scranton on Wednesday, May 11, as part of National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supported “Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” Project. She will draw from the central themes of her award-winning book when she presents “Murder and Mercy: A Colonial Encounter in the Susquehanna Valley,” at 5 p.m. in the PNC Auditorium of the Loyola Science Center on campus.

    At the lecture, Dr. Eustace, a professor of history at New York University, will explore the complex layers of everyday life as colonists encountered and interacted with Native people in Eastern Pennsylvania. A discussion will follow the lecture.

    A second lecture on Wednesday, May 18, titled “Removal and the Right to Remain in the United States,” will also explore the Indigenous History of Northeast Pennsylvania. The talk by Samantha Seeley, Ph.D., associate professor of history at the University of Richmond, will be held at 5 p.m. on May 18, in the Henkelman Room at the Albright Memorial Library. She will discuss her book, “Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the Early United States.” A discussion will follow the lecture.

    Both lectures are offered free of charge to members of the greater Scranton community. Registration is required to attend and can be made at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MurderMercy2022 and/or https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RemovalRight2022. Please email community@scranton.edu or call 570-941-4419 with any questions.

    The lectures are sponsored by the University’s Slattery Center for the Ignatian Humanities, History Department and Office of Community Relations; and community partners the Black Scranton Project, Lackawanna County Arts and Culture Department, Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton Public Library, and WVIA. 

    Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” seeks to capture the unique narrative of Scranton and relate it to the history of the United States prior to the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the United States. The project will incorporate eight themes over a two-year period, including how Scranton has been portrayed in the popular imagination, its industrial era growth, Indigenous history, religious tapestry, diverse immigrant populations – past and present – and the role it played in the Underground Railroad and Black history. Both lectures in May relate to the project’s third theme: “The Indigenous History of Northeast Pennsylvania.”

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