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    Lauren Carosi '16: Being the Light

    April 6, 2020
    "I am so honored to be a health care professional during these times and do my little part in helping save the world."

    Lauren Carosi '16 is a physician assistant working in the emergency room at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey. She had been working in the ER for about a year and a half before the COVID-19 crisis.

    Tell us what life is like for you right now.

    Life is hard here for all of us in the middle of a pandemic, will little PPE and no ventilators left for patients. Each day is extremely challenging and upsetting, but knowing how many people’s lives we are saving at the same time is remarkable. I am so honored to be a health care professional during these times and do my little part in helping save the world. 

    How are you coping when you're at home or how do you prepare for the next day or night at work?

    I am so lucky that I have the most amazing support system of friends and family. Friends and family have continuously been checking in to see how I am doing mentally and emotionally and although they cannot understand completely, they have done an excellent job of keeping me sane.

    I have always loved to exercise and it has continued to be a great escape during these difficult times; lots of walking and long runs! When mentally preparing before a shift, I try to refer back to two of my favorite quotes. One is from a University of Scranton Christmas card I received a few years ago that I still display in my room. It states "When there is darkness, you can be the light." Another quote I tend to refer to is "All you can do is the best you can do at any given time." It's difficult to go to work and know that we cannot adequately do our job due to short staffing and lack of resources. In a time period of uncertainty and of fear, where my hands are tied, my colleagues and I may not be able to take care of and save every single patient. A more positive thought that I try to ruminate on is that I can be supportive and comforting to my patients when they are alone and need it most. 

    • alt placeholderCarosi is seated at right in front of the hospital's disaster relief patient where they are seeing COVID-19 patients.
    • alt placeholderCarosi is second from left.
    "I can be supportive and comforting to my patients when they are alone and need it most."

    Do you find yourself telling others how they can help? What do you say?

    Others can definitely help in the midst of a pandemic! We are so grateful for all the donated meals, donated masks, and recognition that everyone is providing healthcare workers during this time. Each individual can help by continuing to quarantine and practice social distancing as a way to prevent further spread of the coronavirus. Continuous hand washing and avoiding touching your face not only protects you, but it protects others. And just remember, we are all in this together!

    Have you felt prepared for this?

    When choosing to become a physician assistant, I did think I would be an essential employee on the frontline of a pandemic. But I am still extremely happy with my choice to become a healthcare professional, especially during a time when I am needed most!

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